World Children’s Day

World Children’s Day was first established in 1954 as Universal Children's Day. It is celebrated on November 20 each year to promote international togetherness, awareness among children worldwide, and improving children's welfare.

On December 14, 1954, the General Assembly recommended that all countries institute a Universal Children's Day, to be observed as a day of worldwide fraternity and understanding between children. It recommended that it was to be observed as a day of activity devoted to promoting the ideals and objectives of the UN Charter and the welfare of the children of the world. The Assembly suggested to governments that the Day be observed in the way that each considers appropriate.

November 20th is an important date as it is the date in 1959 when the UN General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. It is also the date in 1989 when the UN General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Since 1990, World Children's Day marks the anniversary of the date that the UN General Assembly adopted both the Declaration and the Convention on children's rights.

The Convention, is the most widely ratified international human rights treaty, It sets out a number of children’s rights including the right to life, to health, to education and to play, the right to family life, to be protected from violence, to be shieled against discrimination, and to have their views heard.

Mothers and fathers, teachers, nurses and doctors, government leaders and civil society activists, religious and community elders, corporate moguls and media professionals, as well as young people and children themselves, can play an important part in making World Children's Day relevant for their societies, communities and nations.

World Children's Day offers each of us an inspirational entry-point to advocate, promote and celebrate children's rights, translating into dialogues and actions that will build a better world for children.

This year, the COVID-19 crisis has resulted in a child rights crisis. The costs of the pandemic for children are immediate and, if unaddressed, may last a lifetime.

It’s time for generations to come together to reimagine the type of world we want to create. On 20 November, kids will reimagine a better world. What will you do?

Source: un.org